Hypnotherapy

Hypnotherapy Mind Body Connection KittOMalley.com

Last Friday, I drove my son down to La Jolla (across the street from UC San Diego!) to see pediatric hypnotherapist and pulmonologist, Dr. Ran D. Anbar, MD, FAAP of Center Point Medicine. My son struggles with migraines (greatly improved with recent medication regime), depression, anxiety, eczema, and frequent school absences due to illnesses.

According to Dr. Anbar’s brochure:

Children who use hypnosis:

  • Become empowered to help themselves when they feel poorly, and are proud of themselves for being able to do so.
  • Feel better about themselves and their medical condition because they can help take control of how they feel.
  • Become aware of their inner strength that allows them to cope more effectively with all aspects of their lives.

My mother used hypnotherapy to help her battle non-Hodgkins lymphoma (along with chemotherapy and monoclonal antibody therapy). Hypnotherapy enabled her to feel more in control, and lessened her pain and anxiety. My father quit smoking using hypnotherapy. I’ve used self-hypnosis (all hypnosis is self-hypnosis) to perform well on exams (I studied, too).

Hoping that self-hypnosis will give my son a tool, an effective coping mechanism, not just for somatic illnesses that respond well to hypnosis, but for life. Somatic illnesses are not “just” in the mind. The mind and the body are connected.

Prayer, meditation and self-hypnosis all help body, mind, and soul.