Video Conference

Saturday my niece, Teresa Nichols, interviewed me about my online vision. She has an MBA and her own Cincinnatti based marketing business.

Sorry to my deaf and hard of hearing readers. I tried editing the automatic closed captioning, but found it overwhelming. The interview is over an hour long. As a writer, I found myself editing what we actually said, and decided to leave it alone.

Blocked, But Why?

June 2015 I wrote this post. I no longer notice when or if I’m blocked or unfriended on social media. Perhaps I no longer inundate others with content (perhaps I still do, it’s subjective). As I’m not as active online and as my focus is not just on my self, I’ve gained some new readers and lost others.

Twitter logo of white bird on blue background. Safety @safety - You are blocked from following @safety and viewing @safety's tweets. Learn more

Yesterday I found that someone blocked me on Twitter, and I didn’t know why. It hurt and reminded me of someone else blocking me on Twitter and of yet another person who unfriended me on Facebook and actually informed me that she had done so (why, I have no idea, she didn’t say). The bottom line is: My feelings are hurt. I wonder what I did wrong. I wonder if I did something to injure the other person. I know I post A LOT. Profuse posting can overwhelm others, burying them under a barrage of tweets, posts, and links to follow. I am bipolar after all, so my hypomanic activity is partly symptomatic. I’m passionate, as well, and feel compelled to share great content over social media. In addition, I realize that medication and psychotherapy has helped me, so that someone medication-resistant may not find me a helpful support. Still, it hurts.

Who, Me, Perimenopausal?

How long does perimenopause last, anyway? I, for one, am sick of it.

Learn about perimenopausal depression during Women's Health Week with NIMH expert Dr. Peter Schmidt. Twitter Chat May 13, 11 am ET #NIMHChats

Tomorrow! NIMH Twitter Chat on Perimenopausal Depression – May 13

While transitioning into menopause, women experience various physical, psychological, and social changes that may affect their quality of life. This transition period is known as perimenopause, which has been found to be a time of vulnerability for women to develop depression. Learn more about perimenopausal depression during our Twitter chat tomorrow on May 13th from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET. Please use #NIMHChats to follow the discussion and ask questions.