Creative Writing Prompt: Rainstorm

Irainstorm

Prompt for first creative writing class: RAINSTORM

Rainstorm

The torrential rain kept her awake. She couldn’t sleep. Wasn’t rain supposed to be relaxing? What was it that disturbed her? Why could she not sleep? The rain didn’t lull her, it irritated her. Reminded her that all was not well. The hills may slide. The mud carrying all away. But she was safe. Wasn’t she?

Was it anxiety? Was it caffeine? Was it simply the din amplified by hypomania? Yes, when in this state any noise irritated her. What the hell did she think she was doing this week? Starting to rewrite her book, take a creative writing class, and work out with a personal trainer on the same week her son began college.

He wasn’t away for college. Oh, no. He was attending the local community college and didn’t yet drive. So, on top of everything else, she remained his chauffeur. Fuck. He was getting better. He was more independent than before, but he still relied on her to drive him to classes and to doctors’ appointments. He still didn’t prepare his own breakfast and lunch. He’d just eat a protein bar and banana. At six feet tall and 125 pounds, he needed to eat more.

Caring for him, worrying about him, wore on her. She had hoped that he’d be eating more by now, that he’d make a sandwich or eat a bowl of cereal. She had hoped that he’d feel ready to take his DMV written test, so he could learn to drive.

Though, really, the time that they spent in the car was their special time. Often he wore his headset and cut her off from him. But, there were times when they talked, when they laughed, when he shared his thoughts with her

Back to the storm. Crap transition, but the rainstorm felt like her life. Stormy, but cleansing.

Pulled My Book from the Shelf

Pulled from Self-Publication. Kitt O'Malley Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health. Eliezer Tristan Publishing to the Rescue.

So, I pulled my book, Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health, from the market. Shortly after I self-published it, my father died unexpectedly. Didn’t do adequate marketing because I was and still am in mourning.

Hate the original title, which sounds like a self-help book and is way too dry. Yes, I have bipolar and I blog. But, my bipolar diagnosis is not all I write about and my diagnosis is not the only reason I write. I’m a writer. There, I said it. Rather, I wrote it.

The previously self-published book contained four years of blog posts, dating from September 2013 when I started writing this blog to its five-year anniversary September 2017. I debated adding more content to it, bringing it up to the present. But, I’m too overwhelmed right now to do so.

Freelance writer and editor Janet Coburn highly recommended book coach Aaron J Smith, author of Cultural Savage, and Eliezer Tristan Publishing.

After messaging my friend and fellow mental health advocate, Sarah Fader, I unpublished my book and contracted with Eliezer Tristan (Sarah is the founder and CEO).

Aaron will edit, proof, and design the book cover. The book’s title must change. Sarah Fader agreed that it was a terrible title because it doesn’t sound like me. Title must match my writing style.

Wish us luck.

 

Should I Lower the Price of My Book?

Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health by KItt O'Malley (Author). See all 2 formats and editions. Kindle $9.99. Paperback $14.99. Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health offers hope to those living with mental illness and their loved ones, educates the public about mental health, and fights stigma against those living with mental illness by challenging stereotypes. Kitt O'Malley's writing recounts her struggle with bipolar disorder type II, the two decades it took to get a proper diagnosis, and how her journey ultimately gave her purpose -- and at times, a sense of religious calling.

Considering lowering my book prices. Average paperback price is $13.95 to $17.95, so perhaps $14.99 is a reasonable price for a paperback. Yet, the book would get into more hands if I lowered the price.

But, I priced my ebook at $9.99. Now I’m thinking that’s too high. Have not sold many ebooks on Amazon. $3.99 is the most popular price for an ebook.

Haven’t run any promotions, either. Maybe I should start there…

What do you think?

Update — New Lower Book Prices

Ran Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publising (KDP) Pricing Support Beta. Based on historic data for KDP books similar to Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health, a list price of $4.99 (USD) in a 70% royalty plan maximizes author earnings.

Changing my Amazon Kindle ebook price to $4.99 gives me 70% royalty of $3.44. KDP paperback printing cost is $4.26. 60% paperback royalty of $3.51 yields a price of $12.95.

Making the changes now, because I just roll that way. Quickly and off the cuff, but very publicly and with transparency.

Grief and Putting Book Marketing on Hold

I’ve been grieving and neglecting marketing my book. It will remain. I can go back to it.

Part of me wants to experiment with reformatting it, removing indents, left justifying paragraphs, making sure that widow-orphan control is set up properly. Doing so would be tedious. That, too, can wait…

Published Author at Last!

My Book Published! Amazon.com/author/kittomalley. Books by Kitt O'Malley, Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health.
Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health published today! Visit Amazon.com/author/kittomalley.

Kindle e-book and paperback are live. Copyright registration claimed. Set up author page on both Amazon and GoodReads. Next will get it ready for IngramSpark for publish on demand through other retailers. So excited.

About Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health

Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health offers hope to those living with mental illness and their loved ones, educates the public about mental health, and fights stigma against those living with mental illness by challenging stereotypes.

Kitt O’Malley’s writing recounts her struggle with bipolar disorder type II, the two decades it took to get a proper diagnosis, and how her journey ultimately gave her purpose – and at times, a sense of religious calling.

Though Ms. O’Malley is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, she hasn’t practiced as a psychotherapist in over twenty years. Both her clinical background and personal experience inform her writing and enable her to help both herself and others toward mental health recovery.