Should I Change My Book?

As I’ve grieved my father’s recent death, I’ve thought about updating my book. Not right away. Maybe I’m just trying to get my mind off his passing. Still, please help me decide.

Kitt O'Malley Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health

Here’s the thing: my blog subtitle reads “Love, Learn & Live with Bipolar Disorder,” and my book title is Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health.

Though I consider myself a mental health advocate, I write about what is happening in my life. I don’t just write about living with bipolar disorder. I have it, but it’s not the focus of my daily life.

My blog began when my father-in-law was in sepsis over four years ago. My worries over his health crisis and how it would affect my husband triggered hypomania. So, I wrote. I wrote to cope with hypomanic symptoms. To gain control over racing thoughts. To allay anxiety.

As the years passed, I’ve written about raising my son, my mother’s stroke, and my father’s dementia. Most recently, I’ve been writing about grief.

The grief takes me in waves. I’ve been crying more and more often as time passes. Still, it’s been a healthy grief. My medication, psychotherapy, family and support systems help me stay stable.

Grief can trigger worsening of mental illness and can lead to situational depression. But, so far I’ve been mourning my father’s death well, or so I think (perhaps I’m just well defended).

What you you think? When I feel up to it, should I update my book, adding content written since September 2017? Should I change the title and cover to more accurately reflect the content written? What are your thoughts? Any suggestions?

Should I Lower the Price of My Book?

Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health by KItt O'Malley (Author). See all 2 formats and editions. Kindle $9.99. Paperback $14.99. Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health offers hope to those living with mental illness and their loved ones, educates the public about mental health, and fights stigma against those living with mental illness by challenging stereotypes. Kitt O'Malley's writing recounts her struggle with bipolar disorder type II, the two decades it took to get a proper diagnosis, and how her journey ultimately gave her purpose -- and at times, a sense of religious calling.

Considering lowering my book prices. Average paperback price is $13.95 to $17.95, so perhaps $14.99 is a reasonable price for a paperback. Yet, the book would get into more hands if I lowered the price.

But, I priced my ebook at $9.99. Now I’m thinking that’s too high. Have not sold many ebooks on Amazon. $3.99 is the most popular price for an ebook.

Haven’t run any promotions, either. Maybe I should start there…

What do you think?

Update — New Lower Book Prices

Ran Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publising (KDP) Pricing Support Beta. Based on historic data for KDP books similar to Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health, a list price of $4.99 (USD) in a 70% royalty plan maximizes author earnings.

Changing my Amazon Kindle ebook price to $4.99 gives me 70% royalty of $3.44. KDP paperback printing cost is $4.26. 60% paperback royalty of $3.51 yields a price of $12.95.

Making the changes now, because I just roll that way. Quickly and off the cuff, but very publicly and with transparency.

Grief and Putting Book Marketing on Hold

I’ve been grieving and neglecting marketing my book. It will remain. I can go back to it.

Part of me wants to experiment with reformatting it, removing indents, left justifying paragraphs, making sure that widow-orphan control is set up properly. Doing so would be tedious. That, too, can wait…

Published Author at Last!

My Book Published! Amazon.com/author/kittomalley. Books by Kitt O'Malley, Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health.
Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health published today! Visit Amazon.com/author/kittomalley.

Kindle e-book and paperback are live. Copyright registration claimed. Set up author page on both Amazon and GoodReads. Next will get it ready for IngramSpark for publish on demand through other retailers. So excited.

About Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health

Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health offers hope to those living with mental illness and their loved ones, educates the public about mental health, and fights stigma against those living with mental illness by challenging stereotypes.

Kitt O’Malley’s writing recounts her struggle with bipolar disorder type II, the two decades it took to get a proper diagnosis, and how her journey ultimately gave her purpose – and at times, a sense of religious calling.

Though Ms. O’Malley is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, she hasn’t practiced as a psychotherapist in over twenty years. Both her clinical background and personal experience inform her writing and enable her to help both herself and others toward mental health recovery.

Formatting My First Book

Kitt O'Malley Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health
Kitt O’Malley Blogging for Bipolar Mental Health Book Cover

Been busy formatting my first book for publication. Problem is that while formatting it for Kindle ebook publication, I made changes. I can’t resist editing…

So, my Scrivener project is different than my Word manuscript which is now different than what I formatted using Kindle Create.

Oh, well. Guess that’s why each published version gets it’s own ISBN (actually, Kindle ebook doesn’t require ISBN, but I did buy a bunch of ISBNs).

The versions will be different in small ways. Or, not so small. We’ll see if or when I get around to formatting the Amazon print version, and later the IngramSpark ebook and print versions for distribution to sellers other than Amazon.

Just realized my title changed since I filed my copyright. Oops! Turns out that using a URL in a book title is a no-no. The book cover looks pretty familiar to those who know my brand.

I’ll let you know when the ebook is live.


This Thursday and Friday I’m participating in NAMI Provider Education in preparation for the historic opening of Children’s Hospital of Orange County‘s (CHOC) pediatric psychiatric unit — the first inpatient psychiatric unit for children under age twelve in Orange County. The entire staff will attend the inservice, which is incredible. We expect sixty-three attendees. I’ll be serving on NAMI’s panel as the mental health provider with lived experience.

In the past, parents had to take their kids up to UCLA’s Neuropsychiatric Unit. At CHOC, parents can visit their kids in crisis 24/7. One parent can sleep in the room with their child, which is important for young children.

When our son was hospitalized for dehydration at CHOC in Mission Viejo, we took turns spending the night. CHOC treats kids and their families wonderfully.